ThinkFest Preview: Madeline Bell on the Role of CHOP

PHILADELPHIA MAGAZINE

Madeline Bell, the president and CEO of the Children’s Hospital of Pennsylvania, will hold a ThinkFest Q&A – and it’s an event we’re eagerly awaiting.
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ThinkFest Recap: 3 Takeaways From Madeline Bell on CHOP’s Future

PHILADELPHIA MAGAZINE

“Careers are not linear,” Bell told the audience at ThinkFest on Tuesday in an interview with Monetate CEO Luncinda Duncalfe. Her nontraditional path to the leadership of one of the world’s leading children’s hospitals — CHOP, with 50 locations and 14,000 employees, brings in about $2.5 billion a year — is one for the books. Few organizations in the region have women at the helm, let alone women on their boards or in other top executive positions.
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How 9 Philly Power Women Made It

PHILADELPHIA STYLE MAGAZINE

Madeline Bell is the president and COO of The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, an organization that encompasses more than 50 locations and 13,000 employees and provides essential care to more than 1.2 million children in need each year.
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Let’s be sure children aren’t lost in the healthcare debate

THE HILL

With the Trump Administration in office, talk of changes to healthcare are intensifying. And yet, children’s health coverage has been missing from this conversation. Today, children in the U.S. have nearly universal coverage rates — 95 percent in 2015.
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Madeline Bell Reflects on Nursing and Children’s Hospital

PHILLY.COM

The photo is adorable. Little Madeline, age 3, smiles happily next to her family’s tinseled Christmas tree, hand plunged into her Christmas stocking, clearly pleased with the white nurse’s cap perched on her head.
Now Madeline Bell, 54, with a nursing degree, heads one of the world’s largest health enterprises, the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, where she presides over a $2.5 billion budget and 11,552 employees.
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Women of Distinction: 2013

PHILADELPHIA BUSINESS JOURNAL

Whether they’re a partner in a large law firm, the president of a local college or founder of a thriving company, there’s no doubt that women are leading Philadelphia’s businesses into the future. Now, we recognize the best and most influential women in the city.

Philadelphia Business Journal is pleased to announce the 2013 Women of Distinction Award winners. Women of Distinction spotlights 25 established women executives for professional accomplishments and community involvement.
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Year of the Woman: The Philadelphia Business Journal’s Women to Watch 2016

PHILADELPHIA BUSINESS JOURNAL

The Philadelphia Business Journal decided to take on a major project in 2016 – identifying the women leaders in Philadelphia’s traditionally male-dominated industries.

Each quarter, we unveiled Women to Watch in business sectors that are key to Greater Philadelphia’s economy – health care, commercial real estate, technology and banking and finance.

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Best of Philly: Best Philadelphians

Glass-Ceiling Breaker

Madeline Bell, CEO, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

There’s so much to extol about Bell that it’s hard to know where to begin. So we’ll let her résumé do the talking: CHOP nurse turned first female CEO of one of the country’s top children’s hospitals (that employs more than 11,000 people, mind you), mother of seven, blogger, lifelong learner, strong and empathetic leader, newly appointed Comcast board member and Philly native. She’s been on the job for just over a year and is already an inspiration to all ambitious women.

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Children’s Hospital CEO Madeline Bell joined Comcast board to ‘get out of my comfort zone’

PHILLY VOICE

Madeline Bell’s success story keeps on adding more chapters. Over the past several decades she’s risen from pediatric nurse to serving as the first female CEO of the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and last week she became just the second woman to join the corporate board of Comcast.

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Time for women to take charge

PHILADELPHIA BUSINESS JOURNAL

One local expert in women’s leadership has a term for most of the Greater Philadelphia constituency of CEOs: SWAM. (Straight, white, able-bodied men.

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The Evolving Role of Leadership featuring Madeline Bell

VILLANOVA HRD CORNER

On Tuesday, September 23rd, President and Chief Operating Officer (COO) of the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), Madeline Bell, visited Villanova University to address friends and members of the University community about her career path, leadership, motivation, and advice for becoming a successful and confident leader.

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Nursing Alumna and President of CHOP to make Commencement Address

THE VILLANOVIAN

“I’m very excited about Madeline saying yes to us,” says Rev. Peter Donohue, O.S.A., University President. “It’s wonderful that students can actually hear from someone who was where they are right now. She is a successful alum…and a reflection of the preparation for success that Villanova provides.”

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First Female CEO Coming to CHOP

PHILADELPHIA BUSINESS JOURNAL

CHOP announced Altschuler is retiring as head of the Philadelphia pediatric hospital effective July 1 after 15 years as its CEO. Madeline Bell, who as served as president and chief operating officer of CHOP for the past five years, is being promoted to CEO.

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CEO of Nation’s First Children’s Hospital Documents History of The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

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Introducing the 2016 Most Admired CEOs.

PHILADELPHIA BUSINESS JOURNAL

The Philadelphia Business Journal has honored the Most Admired CEOs in our region since 2014.
In choosing the winners, what we’re looking for is evidence of true leadership – at the company, organization or firm and in the community.

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High heels make the look, says Childrens-Hospital-CEO Madeline Bell

PHILLY.COM

Heels or not? Are they must for executive women? Madeline Bell, chief executive at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, says she wears heels every day. (She was wearing heels  — and not particularly high ones on the day I interviewed her for my Executive Q&A, published in Sunday’s Philadelphia Inquirer.)

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